Category Archives: self confidence

Dyslexie Font: Developed For Those With Dyslexia

downloadDyslexia Font is a print and electronic font designed to be easily read by those with dyslexia. The theory behind Dyslexie Font is that when text characters are distinctive it’s unlikely that they will be confusing to read. According to Dyslexiefont.com, “traditional fonts are designed solely from an aesthetic point of view which means they often have characteristics that make characters difficult to recognize for people with dyslexia.”

Dyslexia Font was developed by Christian Boer while he was a student in Amsterdam. It has won many honors including the 2010 Smart Future Minds award in Amsterdam. Boer, who suffers from dyslexia, was looking for a type that would make reading easier. He discovered that spacing characters further apart, creating a heavier base line for characters and making the openings of letters like c,u, and s more pronounced had a dramatic effect. Other aspects of Dyslexia Font include a slight right slant, different heights for smaller letters, and varying the length of sticks and tails in letters such as b, p and q. Additionally, Boer’s research found that text colored blue is easier for dyslexics to read and that the ratio of white space verses printed text has a profound effect as well.

Dyslexie Font is available as an App or an extension for Google Chrome. It’s invaluable for browsing the web, reading / writing email or creating Google Docs. Dyslexie Font is just as easy to turn off – just click the icon and text reverts back to the original.  For more information or to download a free version of the software visit  Dyslexie Font Website

Tips for Parenting Children Living with ADHD

adhdA recent article from the NAMI Website, Parenting Children Living with ADHD: Tips for Parents, offers ways to deal with some of the challenges kids with ADHD have from experiencing difficulty with peer relationships to not listening or following through with instructions. A summary of the article’s recommendations for supporting children living with ADHD follows.

 

  • Maintain a positive attitude. Focus on your child’s successes and victories in overcoming ADHD and less on the challenges or obstacles of the condition.

 

  • Create and maintain structure. Children living with ADHD are more likely to succeed when they have a regular schedule of tasks each day.

 

  • Communicate rules and expectations. Children living with ADHD do well with clear and simple rules and expectations that they can easily understand and follow. Write down any rules and expectations and post them in a place where your child can easily read them. Explain the consequences when rules are broken and praise your child when they are obeyed.

 

  • Encourage movement and sleep. Children who live with ADHD have energy to burn. Organized sports and other physical activities can help them increase their self-esteem and unleash their energy in healthy and productive ways.

 

  • Focus on social skills. Children living with ADHD often have difficulty with peer relationships and making friends. They may have trouble with reading social cues, talking too much, interrupting frequently or coming off as inappropriately aggressive. Model social skills for your child, hire a life coach or work with your child’s therapist to address this important issue.

 

  • Work with your child’s school. Openly communicate with your child’s teacher and other school personnel about their observations of your child in the classroom and your child’s behavior at home.

Back To School Homework Plan

homeworkTaking a proactive approach to student success is what Greenwood School is all about.  We want to help you, as parents, to give your student every opportunity to succeed in school.  As  we begin this new school year keep in mind that research shows that students who  have help at home do better academically.  One thing that you can do to ensure a successful transition back to school is to develop a consistent homework routine.  A quick review of Greenwood’s Homework Policy shows that you can expect to spend 10 minutes of homework per grade to include 15 minutes of reading.  For example, a 6th grader can expect to spend 45  minutes on homework assignments plus 15 minutes on reading.  

For a realistic and easy to implement homework plan we refer to  Dr. Kenny Handelman’s book  Attention Difference Disorder:  How to Turn Your ADHD Child or Teen’s Differences into Strengths in 7 Simple Steps.  Dr. Handelman suggests  designating a daily time to start and complete homework.  Some kids work best in the afternoon, following a snack and play period while others may prefer to wait until after dinner. Find the time that works for you and your student and stick to it.  

At the designated time review assignments with your student to create a plan for the work to be completed and then get out a timer. Dr. Handelman recommends using a  timer as it  helps those with ADHD and time issues to visualize deadlines. Breaking the homework assignments down into manageable chunks is another useful strategy.  Once you have a plan to complete the homework be a monitor as well as a motivator. Give encouragement, check completed homework, and make yourself available for questions and concerns. Once homework is completed take an extra minute to ensure that your child’s backpack is properly packed and ready to go for the next day to avoid the early morning “get out the door” drama.   

Establishing and maintaining a consistent routine will help your student to develop good study habits and contributes to your child’s school and ultimately life success.  For other tips and strategies to help students with ADHD succeed see Dr. Handelman’s book, Attention Difference Disorder:  How to Turn Your ADHD Child or Teen’s Differences into Strengths in 7 Simple Steps.  It is available for parent checkout from the professional collection at the Greenwood School Library.

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